The Quietest Industry

It is ironic that an industry built around the human voice has so little said about it. I am thankful for sites like No Jitter, Daily Cloud, and Network World. There are scant resources for even finding comparative tests that are helpful for companies making a big decision. I had never even seen the NY Times cover telephone systems until the phone hacking article saw phone system hacking hit the mainstream media.

Of course, you can turn to the tech community, but you will find that telecom is an IT backwater. Sites like spiceworks and stackoverflow are amazing, fantastic resources that do not quite focus on telecom enough to be useful all the time for help and comparisons, and you never know if the person posting is a shill for a brand or not. Communities like reddit are similarly hit or miss, and written from perspectives that may not be your own. For example, the complaint about the type of RAID a Zultys system runs may be fascinating to sysadmins but perhaps not so important for a small business looking to get some cool new desktop integration features with their phone system.

One concern buyers of telecom equipment should have is in the use of industry consultant reports. Some have noted that some consultants, after receiving funding from an industry group, produce reports that further the interests of said group or are ‘astroturf’ support groups. Some writers describe a web of contributions and partnerships (not just in the USA, but overseas too) in a cottage industry of big telecom players like AT&T and Verizon supporting certain industry research groups which churn out reports favoring policies big telecom players like, which are in turn handed to Congressmen who receive donations from big telecom players and promote these special interests in Congress via bills and votes.

Industry awards might not be much help either. In this award ceremony, there was a tie between Citrix and Microsoft for Best Small Business Application Virtualization Software Providers – not much help if you are choosing between the two leading providers, who happen to be Citrix and Microsoft, at least at the time this was released.

In the end, outside of asking various reps a lot of questions, you are going to embark on a lonely journey in telecom research. Our advice is to see demos, ask for references, and even go on site visits to customers that have the systems you are considering purchasing. Don’t be shy about asking to try a trial or hosted version of the product you are looking at, there is no substitute for direct experience with a product. And take independent, 3rd party reviews with a grain of salt. There is big money in telecom and not a lot of press coverage, which leads to a lot of raised eyebrows when reports and reviews are tossed around.